NanoSight FAQs

  • What is the smallest size I can detect?

    • Well the annoying answer is its sample dependent
    • If its a biological or low refractive material like protein then its unlikely you can detect below 50nm
    • If its a refractive material like Au then 10nm is possible with a suitable camera and laser.
  • What is the largest particle size I can work with?

    • That also depend, generally we think 2000nm or 2 microns is a good rule
    • Dense materials may settle and upset measurement
  • What parameter/value must I use when running Latex standards on a Nanosight NTA analysis?

    • the correct value is the Modal value in the NanoSight results, not the mean.
  • Are bubbles a problem?

    • YES as they will be measured, can cause flare and can disturb sample introduction and sample stability
    • Great care must be take to avoid introducing bubbles and in stopping leaks.
  • Are leaks a problem? 

    • If you have leaks that cannot simply be corrected, contact an engineer.
    • However a constant slow drift of sample particles across the measuring zone is corrected for with version 2.3 and 3.0 software.
  • Can I use my own PC?  

    • Not really is the simple answer. 
    • The specification of a high end Computer and the installation, wiring and configuration of very specific drivers and ports is unusually demanding. 
    • If you must supply what you think is a suitable computer, it has to go to Malvern (at your cost and risk) for configuration and testing and this will be charged for. 
    • We will take no responsibility for PCs not sourced via NanoSight/Malvern and this means if the instrument doesn’t work with “your” computer, we will only advise, not accept any liability for the problem..
  • Can I supply the syringe pump myself?  

    • Yes in theory but really we take no responsibility for integrating into the software, control or performance.
    • The Nanosight pump is specially configured, its not standard.
  • What is a good sample focus?

    • Ideally you need to see circles of light, not refraction circles or blurred hazy dots.
    • You also need to see the smallest particles
  • poor good focus